Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Welcome Columbia Dental


Written by Lanae Rivers-Woods, South of Seoul Volunteer
Edited by Jessica Lister, South of Seoul Volunteer

If you know Sam at Attractive Coffee, you have heard that his aunt is bringing her Seoul dental clinic to Anjeongri. No need to make a big trip to Seoul for dental anymore, it came to us.  The new clinic is called Columbia Dental and it's opening over the top of where Sam's new coffee shop will be next to Brown Stone Apartments. As you can imagine, he is super excited and asked us if I could meet his aunt and help welcome her to the neighborhood. Of course I can't say no to Sam, so we went to meet her and see the new space. All I have to say after my first visit is, "YASSSS! OMG so fancy." Yup, I'm so articulate.

Also, as it turns out, Sam's aunt has a name, Dr. Jina Lee Linton. She is extremely accomplished and went to what my sister and I call "fancy school". She studied dentistry at Columbia University in New York, with a specialization in Orthodontics, and received her D.D.S. and her Ph.D from Yonsei (a fancy Korean school). She is licensed in the US, Korea and China. Dr. Linton has also done plenty of research and published many articles. It's a ridiculously impressive resume. She has been running dental clinics for 26 years. Her English is also flawless and she was incredibly easy to talk to and welcoming. We are so lucky to have her here.

Her partner in the practice, Dr. Jung is also very accomplished and very friendly. His focus is on implant dentistry so the Dr's practices compliment each other well. We didn't get to talk much but he was super smiley and friendly and gave off a warm inviting vibe. His daughter also works at the practice with them and was lovely. Dr. Jung will certainly make you feel very comfortable.

Sunny getting oriented to the new office.
The other staff that I met at Columbia Dental were also really friendly. Dr. Linton and Dr. Jung know that many of their clients won't speak Korean so they have prepared well. A number of their technicians speak English and I also met their English speaking patient representative, Sunny. She will be helping foreigners when we come to the clinic. It's great that they have a designated person for this roll. I think it will make it much more comfortable. It's already scary enough going to the dentist, adding a language barrier to it can be too much.


Anyway, they gave me a lovely tour of the clinic and it was soooo friggin pretty. It resides on two floors and has elevator access. The 3rd floor of the building is where their reception and primary customer care areas are. They will eventually even have a little, covered play area for kids on the outside deck (It's not finished yet, but someday). The 4th floor has some work spaces, the sterilization room (as a germ freak I geeked out a little when I saw how nice it was) and staff offices.

Sterilization room is so pretty. The staff have a nice view.
The space has a modern, mixed western and Korean style; super clean and sharp. The equipment is all brand spanking new. Some of the dental chairs are in an open shared space with nice views of the area parks. This is where many of the kids get treatments. This open layout is very common in Korea where space can be limited. (When I first moved here it was shocking to me, but I've since realized it's a great use of space.)

I think it's important to point out that the clinic is excited about serving families. They like kids, they are looking forward to kids, and they took them into consideration in planning the clinic layout. Don't be shy about showing up with the little ones who need dental care.


When I asked about insurance they said they take Korean National Insurance and they also direct bill Tricare (which is great news for military). They have been direct billing Tricare since 2006 so they have tons of experience with it. When I asked about prices they said they follow the Tricare recommended costs and then often charge a bit less. So basically their costs are structured to make sure they work easily with the insurance carried by the majority of their clients. It was good to know they have a standard that they follow to keep things consistent. I always feel better when a business can tell me a clear system they use for pricing.

I honestly didn't know what to expect when Sam asked if I could meet his aunt and who wants to spend their free time at a Dental clinic when they could go home and cuddle with their puppies? However, after visiting, I'm glad I didn't listen to that voice in my head because I truly enjoyed my visit. I honestly like this group of people. I can see where Sam got his charm and warmth. I'm now looking forward to the dental work that I've put off an embarrassingly stupid long time.

In the past I have had dental work done in Korea and it was excellent. No pain, no stress, and affordable. The problem was that the clinic was in Seoul and it was too much of a hassle. I researched other dentist in Pyeongtaek and found some great options (which are in the South of Seoul app) but, for a variety of reasons, I just never went. Now I have no excuses. My ideal clinic has come to me. I will absolutely be booking my appointment at Columbia Dental.

You can call them at 031-692-3768 or 010-6692-3768 to make an appointment. There will be someone available to help you in English. We have also added Columbia Dental to the South of Seoul app. WAZE links (including where to park) and additional information available there.

Now it's time to go try them all and leave your reviews in the South of Seoul app. Just go the app, open the listing, and click the star in the banner. You can tell us all what you thought. Remember to include useful tips like where you parked, if they had chairs for kids, or other details you found important. Reviews help us build a beautiful life together. One Star reviews with no explanation may be rejected.

For address and WAZE directions to anything on this blog download the South of Seoul App from either Google Play or Apple App Store. 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.app.southofseoulz

Why we do this:
We made the app to accompany the blog because it's easier to keep update with current information. In the past we've tried keeping the information on the blog but it's too hard for us to maintain the information in two places at once over time. Since we compile and write blogs around a full time jobs without compensation, we need to do it the most efficient way possible with as few steps as possible. 


Monday, January 8, 2018

5 Kids Cafes in Pyeongtaek





By Sarah Hill-Powell, South of Seoul Volunteer

Edited by Jessica Lister, South of Seoul Volunteer
The New Year is here, and so is the cold weather! Though it may be a delightful break from the humid and hot summer season, with temperatures so low and winds so sharp, winters can be rough to ride out - especially for families with little ones, who end up bouncing off the walls in a cabin-fever-induced frenzy.

Fear not! Kid Cafes are abundant in Korea, with several indoor playground options existing within both Paengseong and Pyeongtaek City. This list isn’t meant to be a ‘best of’ list, but rather, one that boosts awareness of the choices available to the Pyeongtaek area. Note; most of the places detailed in this article are geared towards younger children (4 years and under). All listings can be found on the SOS app in the Pyeongtaek >> Spotlight: Families directory.

Things to know before going to a kids cafe for the first time:
  • You’ll leave your shoes at the entrance - there’s almost always a designated space, sometimes with locking cubbies, to keep your shoes (and other belongings if you so choose). 
  • Children under 12 months are often free at many establishments, but you’ll need to bring visual proof if your child’s age isn’t obvious. This is also not a guarantee.
  • At most cafes, adult admission is either the purchase of a drink or a small flat fee. 
  • More often than not, you’ll pay everything you owe at the end of your stay, but sometimes, you pay the child’s admission first, before entering, and then any additional charges are settled before you leave.
  • Kids cafes are mostly kid-proofed, but not always baby-proofed; many of them have “wooden block” pits, much like a sandpit, and many kinds of small toys - perfect choking hazards for the curious baby - so keep that in mind.
  • Diaper changing areas usually coincide with rooms set aside for nursing mothers, though sometimes there will be space in the bathrooms.

The Fun Factory
Waze: The Fun Factory - Kids Cafe
Hours: 10:00am ~ 8:00pm

Very close to Camp Humphreys' Dongchang-Ri gate, this large, spacious kids cafe shares a building with The Learning Tree Daycare. Teachers monitor their students when they play out in the main room (so, yes, the day care kids and the kids cafe patrons have opportunity to mingle). The Fun Factory opened at the beginning of December 2017, so at the time of writing this article (Jan 2018), it was brand new and squeaky clean. The play area is geared towards children aged 15 months to 5 years, and it has slides, trampolines, and even has a moderately sized rock-climbing wall for the slightly older kids. There are toys available for role-play (house, kitchen, costumes etc) and the cafe has a decent sized menu, which includes full meals in addition to the coffees and teas that are standard at kids cafes. The facility can be rented out for parties. Parking is available in the parking lot as well as along the road.


La Cartata Kids Cafe
Waze: La Cartata kids cafe 차타타 
Hours: 9:30am ~ 8:30pm

La Cartata is a kids cafe with a fun spin (no pun intended). In addition to the usual play areas, trampolines, toys, and ball pits, this cafe boasts a long racetrack where children can drive their own cars, either steering themselves or with a parent operating the vehicle via remote control. The racetrack is separate from the majority of the play space, but you will have to be mindful of your smaller children as there’s no real barrier to keep them out of the car lanes if they wandered into them (however, an employee is always manning the car station, and the cars themselves aren’t terribly fast). Cartata is a bit pricier than the average kids cafe, but the novelty is worth it. Even without the added car aspect, the play area is very large, and offers multiple kinds of play to keep children occupied who aren’t particularly interested in the cars. The rates and menu items are displayed in both Korean and English behind the cashier’s counter. Their cafe doesn’t offer full meals but they have snack foods such as, ice cream, teas, juices, and coffees. Birthday reservations are available. Cartata is located on the 8th floor of its building, which also houses the Ebadom Family Restaurant - a great place for Korean cuisine with a large play area of its own. Parking is available below the building.


Rubling Premium Kids Cafe
Waze: Rubling Premium Kids Cafe
Hours: Weekdays 11:00am ~ 08:00pm, Weekends & holidays 10:30am ~ 08:30pm

Rubling is a sophisticated, classy-looking kids cafe located on the 5th floor. Don’t worry, just because they’re a “premium” kids cafe doesn’t make them any more expensive than your average kids cafe. They have a menu that includes full meals and drinks, but none of it is in English. They have various toys, including a kid-sized piano and drum set. There’s a section to set your smaller babies in that is walled off from the rest of the floor. Play areas include ball pits, slides, trampolines, various role-play stations, doll houses, a block table area with Duplo sized blocks, a wooden block pit and more. Parking is available in the garage below the building.


Yoohoo Jumping Club
Waze: Yoohoo Jumping Cafe
Hours: Weekdays 11:00am ~ 8:30pm, Weekends 10:00am ~ 9:00pm

Located in a family friendly area of Anjung, right across the street from Hyeonhwa Park, is the Pyeongtaek branch of the Yoohoo Jumping Club - a popular kids cafe chain. This location’s admission fee is inexpensive compared to other kid cafes, and the food menu is cheap. Yoohoo has a very spacious trampoline area - perfect for older kids; they also have a baby-only trampoline. There is an actual sandpit in addition to the wooden block pits (they have boots for your kids to wear specifically for the sand and there’s a washing station nearby to minimize mess). There’s a swinging pirate ship ride (for little ones) and some arcade style games meant as a space for middle school aged kids. A Party Room is available for rent and it includes karaoke/norebang. Menu items include full meals (fried rice, pasta, pizza, etc), ice cream, snacks, sodas, coffees and teas. All menus are in hangul.


Nori Park Kids Cafe 
Waze: Nori Park Kids Cafe - Parking
Hours: Weekdays 12:00pm ~ 8:00pm, Weekends 10:00am ~ 8:00pm

This charming, cozy, well-priced kids cafe rests above The Flat White Cafe. The facility is a good size - it’s not so big that you lose track of your little ones, but it’s big enough to keep them exploring. All the regular toy fixtures are present - kitchens, train tables, dolls, dinosaurs, dump trucks, blocks, and so on. There’s a baby trampoline for the littler kids that is well-separated from the large trampoline for the older kids. There’s also a moderately sized party room with a karaoke machine and it's tucked away from the main dining area making it easier to delineate party traffic. The bathrooms and changing areas are easily accessible. They have a wii. All menus and admission information is in hangul, but they were easy to parse, and rates are average. Parking is below ground, in the building, but it's a tight fit for American sized cars. There's a fair amount of parking on the alley street behind the building.

Honorable Mentions


Jump Nori in Paengseong
Waze: jump nori
Hours: 10:00am ~ 9:00pm, usually closed Tuesdays

A favorite of the community surrounding Camp Humphreys - for both locals and foreigners alike. The owner is very friendly and speaks great English. The menus and signage are in both English and Korean, and there is a good variety of foo; pizza/pasta, rice options, snacks, bread, coffees and teas. Rates are very reasonable, which is always a plus - but especially if you have multiple children. I also like the size of the playground. It’s big enough to keep kids occupied, but not so big that you can’t easily keep an eye on younger children. Jump Nori can host birthday parties and has a small separate room available for such occasions. Parking is usually easily available behind the building in front of the grocery store.


Paengseong Welfare Town (2nd floor playground)
Waze: paengseong welfare town
Hours: Weekdays 10:00am ~ 6:00pm, closed on Weekends

Another great option in the Paengseong area is the playground on the second floor of the Paengseong Welfare Town (go up the elevators or the stairs and keep heading towards your left). Best thing about it? It’s FREE. And you can stay as long as you’d like. Just show up, leave your shoes at the door, and start playing! There are slides, padded floors, a diaper changing room, and plenty of seating (no tables, though). This location is very young-baby-friendly, with no small toys or sharp corners, leaving lots of space for your new walkers or avid crawlers to get around. They also offer a toy rental service for children aged 5 and under (for 10,000 won a year, you can rent two toys for two weeks). This includes LARGE baby items like bouncers, rocking horses, tricycles, and so on, making it a great alternative to buying those items outright. Be sure to bring proof of Pyeongtaek residency when you sign up for toy rentals. There’s a coffee shop on the first floor of the building and you can bring food and drink into the playroom as long as you are responsible for your items.There is a parking lot in front of the building, but sometimes, space can be scarce at high-traffic times of the day.
Now it's time to go try them all and leave your reviews in the South of Seoul app. Just go the app, open the listing, and click the star in the banner. You can tell us all what you thought. Remember to include useful tips like where you parked, if they had chairs for kids, or other details you found important. Reviews help us build a beautiful life together. One Star reviews with no explanation may be rejected.

For address and WAZE directions to anything on this blog download the South of Seoul App from either Google Play or Apple App Store. 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.app.southofseoulz

Why we do this:
We made the app to accompany the blog because it's easier to keep update with current information. In the past we've tried keeping the information on the blog but it's too hard for us to maintain the information in two places at once over time. Since we compile and write blogs around a full time jobs without compensation, we need to do it the most efficient way possible with as few steps as possible. 

Thursday, January 4, 2018

5 NOT Spicy Korean Soups for Winter


Although the spicy food in Korea gets a lot of the attention, not all the food here has the spice cranked up to 11. The truth is, there are many dishes and restaurants where the only spicy food on the table is the kimchi. They just aren't as sexy to blog about. Sadly, this means many people who hate to eat spicy hot foods think there are no good choices for them. Don't worry, we've got your back.

Let's take a look at 5 of our favorite non-spicy soups during the winter. Please note, these are not ALL of the non-spicy soups. It's just a list of our winter favorites (even though local folks tend to eat a few of these only in the summer, as waeguks we take liberties to love them year round).

Just like we did with the 5 Best Korean Stews/Soups for Winter we will include a place in Pyeongtaek for you to try the dish and a recipe vlog by a famed Korean food vlogger if one is available.

All right, lets get started...

1. Beef Short Rib Soup (Galbitang) 갈비탕
The bone broth soups are our big favorites. They are filled with nutrition and very easy on the stomach. Perfect for people who aren't big on strong flavors or spice. The dish is often filled with glass noodles and served with rice. Even though it doesn't look like much, you will go away full. Getting the meat off the bones can be tricky, but don't be shy. Scrape them clean.

Where we like to eat it:
Gariheon Galbitang가리헌갈비탕
Direcotry: Pyeongtaek


Maangchi shows you how to make it at home:


2. Ox Bone Soup (Seolleongtang) 설렁탕
This is another bone broth, but less bones and meat. Instead there are just thin slices of meat and lots of broth and noodles. Honestly, if you eat a lot of this, you will look quite radiant. It gives your skin quite the boost in the cold winter months.

Where we like to eat it:

Maangchi shows you how to make it at home:


3. Chicken & Ginseng Soup (Samgyetang) 삼계탕
This is a very light soup that includes a whole chicken stuffed with rice. You often have to order it ahead or plan on waiting because it takes a little while to cook. This dish is totally opposite of what you might associate with Korea food. The strongest flavor is the salt. Great for if you aren't feeling well.

Where we like to eat it: 
Ji Ho Samgyaetang 지호한방삼계탕
Directory: Pyeongtaek


Maangchi shows you how to make it at home:


4. Chicken Noodle Soup (Dalk kalguksu) 닭칼국수
If you have a hankering for old fashioned chicken (dalk) noodle soup (kalkjuksu), you will find this Korean dish will hit the spot. Hearty, thick homemade noodles in a light broth, and pulled chicken, will leave you feeling like you have found home again. There are also seafood and mushroom versions of this soup. Please note that not ALL kalguksu is non-spicy.

Where we like to eat it:
Chicken and Duck Restaurant 남도닭오리한마당
Directory: Pyeongtaek 
Food+Fun: Anjung, Cheongbuk 안중, 청북


Maangchi shows you how to make it at home:



5. Mushroom Chicken Soup 버섯백숙
If you are feeling like a little seafood, this is the BEST! Thick, hearty noodles covered in shellfish is one of our all time favorite meals. Usually the bowls are so huge you can barely finish them. Don't even feel bad if you can't.

Where we like to eat it: 
Mushroom Chicken Soup 나능이능이버섯백숙
Directory: Pyeongtaek
Food+Fun: Ichung 이충, 장안, 가재

Now it's time to go try them all and leave your reviews in the South of Seoul app. Just go the app, open the listing, and click the star in the banner. You can tell us all what you thought. Remember to include useful tips like where you parked, if they had chairs for kids, or other details you found important. Reviews help us build a beautiful life together. One Star reviews with no explanation may be rejected.

For address and WAZE directions to anything on this blog download the South of Seoul App from either Google Play or Apple App Store. 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.app.southofseoulz

Why we do this:
We made the app to accompany the blog because it's easier to keep update with current information. In the past we've tried keeping the information on the blog but it's too hard for us to maintain the information in two places at once over time. Since we compile and write blogs around a full time jobs without compensation, we need to do it the most efficient way possible with as few steps as possible. 

Thursday, December 28, 2017

5 Ways to Learn Korean In Pyeongtaek


With 2018 knocking on the door it's time to start on your resolutions early. Since we all live in Korea, I think it's fair to say studying Korean is on most of our lists. South of Seoul is here to help you connect with the resources you need to improve your language skills. Our volunteers have tried all of these study options and found them to be both reliable and helpful. Each solution has a different strength and all of them are affordable and accessible.


Pre-registration required.

Let's start with an affordable program sponsored by the local government. PIEF is an amazing organization working to make sure Pyeongtaek residents have access to affordable language classes (and much more).  They have locations in both Songtan and Paenseong, but we are only listing the Paengseong classes since that's what has been advertised publicly. Of you live in Songtan please contact their center directly for information on classes.

This semester they are offering both morning and evening classes which will be helpful to people who work morning or nights. They are also easy to access from either Camp Humphryes or Pyeongtaek Station.

WHERE:
Paengseong Location Near Camp Humphreys
(The 20 bus from in front of McDonalds near Pyeongtaek Station)
COST: 
25,000 won for 10 classes (Crazy affordable)
Payment Method: 
Card (Easy to pay)
WHEN: 
January 17~March 28 (Wednesdays)
TIMES: 
Morning 10AM~12PM (Basic)
Evening 7PM~9PM (Basic & Intermediate)

TEXT BOOKS:
You can buy books for these classes from Brooklyn English Used Books in Paengseong near the Camp Humphreys walking gate. The store is listed in the South of Seoul app.

Pre-registration required.



Speaking of Brooklyn English Used Books, you can also study Korean there for free! Well, you will most likely need to buy a book but after that Diana fills your head with tons of useful Korean knowledge for FREE. She is amazing. Takes you under her wing and makes you feel at home. The only drawback is that these classes are only in the morning, however, this is perfect for those working nights.

These classes are always listed in the South of Seoul calendar so they are easy to find.

WHERE:
COST: 
Only the cost of materials. Class is Free.
WHEN: 
Thursdays and Fridays
TIMES: 
Morning 9:30am-11:30am
TEXT BOOKS:
Available in the store.



No matter how many classes you take, sometimes you need extra help. That's when you need to call in the professionals and invest some dollars. Jennifer provides custom classes that help you address the individual issues that you face. She is creative and encouraging in her approach. Some of our volunteers have studied with her for years since they need advanced studies classes simply can't provide.

We highly recommend this option for those who plan on being in Korea over time, those that are preparing for Korean language exams, need to improve their writing skills, and for those who wish to progress past basic level.

WHERE:
Varies, but usually near Pyeongtaek Station
COST: 
30,000 won an hour
Payment Method:
Cash or Bank Transfer



Ok, let's say you want to get a better visa and learn Korean for realz realz. What you need to do is get signed up for the KIIP language classes. These classes are trial by fire. Your teacher will not speak any English, your classes could be 2-8 hours long, and it's quite likely that none of your classmates speak English either. It's one of the best experiences you can have, but it's brutal and amazing and terrifying. 

These classes are offered online as well as at Pyeongtaek University and near Osan Station. You will need to make an online ID to get signed up. You will also most likely need a Korean person to help you with this. It's a challenge that can be overcome with the right help. We can't recommend this enough, but it's also seriously hardcore. This is for people on a mission.

WHEN:
Read the Banner for Registration Dates Dates.
You need to register on the website for an entrance test.
After the test you will register for classes. 
Exact dates and times only available after you register.
COST:
Free except cost of the book.
BENEFITS:
Points for better visas, knowledge of the culture, friendships, excellent Korean skills, and more.



Let's say you have no time and no money. You can still learn. Just pull up YouTube and start following Talk to Me in Korean. Watch all their videos and follow along. Hands down, this is one of the best resources for learning Korean online. Their information is accurate and informative while also being entertaining. If you watch their videos and do their workbooks you are going to have a lot of success. We have used them to supplement our studies and truly appreciate the work and effort they put in. 

The videos are also accompanied by an excellent blog resource so they truly do have you covered.


There you have it. A little something for everyone. Now you don't have an excuse not to get started! Go forth, learn, explore, and love life south of Seoul.

Wednesday, December 27, 2017

5 Japanese Ramen Restaurants in Pyeongtaek


For those in the know, there is a big difference between Japanese and Korean ramen/ramyeon. They are like night and day. In the South of Seoul app we refer to Japanese style as ramen and Korean style as ramyeon. This refers to the slightly different pronunciation between the languages. You can read more about it here.

For a very long time Pyeongtaek was nearly void of viable Japanese style ramen. However, like with everything else in the area, that's no longer true. New places are popping up every few months. We now have at least 5 solid places to slurp on a big bowl of warm broth and noodles. We couldn't be happier about this. Oddly, we haven't found a clear favorite yet. Each ramen joint has a slightly different strength.

During winter, Japanese ramen can be an excellent way to warm up and most restaurants offer both non-spicy and spicy versions. A little something for everyone. Most of the restaurants also have English menus. If they don't, just use the photo translate feature in your translation apps.


1. Hotto Hotto Ramen
Songtan near Osan AF Base

This is the newest addition to the ramen list and it's good. Very good. They put a great deal of work into their soups and other dishes. This particular version is based on the Okinawa style. In addition to being delicious, it's beautiful to look at.


2. Higashi Ramen
Pyeongtaek Tong Bok Market

Hidden between a Japanese snack bar and the board game pub, this little gem has some excellent noodles and a few tasty versions. We HIGHLY recommend searching this place out even though it can be hard to find. They have a variety of broth styles that differ from other shops and we have been happy with all we've tried.


3. Raku Raku
Pyeongtae City, AK Plaza Area

This has been a favorite in Pyeongtaek for awhile. A true neighborhood joint. The place is also super cute with tons of memorabilia and notes. Like all ramen joints in the city, there aren't many seats. The owner is also really great. Our friend lost money on the floor and didn't realize it. Another guest turned it in to the owner and he checked CCTV, saw it was my friend sitting in the seat, and when she came back many weeks later he gave it back to her. Basically, delicious food and great people.


4. Omoya
Songtan near Osan AF Base

This is sort of Japanese and sort of Korean style. It's a little half and half but still enjoyable. They also have quite a few other things on the menu and more places to sit than many ramen shops. It's a great place to go late at night with friends.


5. Japanese Ramen
Pyeongtaek City, AK Plaza Area

This is the most inconsistent of the ramen shops but it's location makes it useful. When you are near Pyeongtaek Station, this is an affordable place to grab a simple lunch. They tend to be pretty quick with the orders as well, so you can be in and out. There are days it's truly lovely and other days it's just sort of O.K. On all days it's better than fast food.
Now it's time to go try them all and leave your reviews in the South of Seoul app. Just go the app, open the listing, and click the star in the banner. You can tell us all what you thought. Remember to include useful tips like where you parked, if they had chairs for kids, or other details you found important. Reviews help us build a beautiful life together. One Star reviews with no explanation may be rejected.

For address and WAZE directions to anything on this blog download the South of Seoul App from either Google Play or Apple App Store. 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.app.southofseoulz

Why we do this:
We made the app to accompany the blog because it's easier to keep update with current information. In the past we've tried keeping the information on the blog but it's too hard for us to maintain the information in two places at once over time. Since we compile and write blogs around a full time jobs without compensation, we need to do it the most efficient way possible with as few steps as possible.